Completing the Platonic Solids at the Curious Minds Club, and making a hyperbolic surface (St Thomas of Canterbury Primary School, 31 January 2020)

This week at the Curious Minds Club we built the final two Platonic Solids, the Dodecahedron and the Isocahedron.

We used the same materials as last week: Polydron Frameworks and generic Geomag. For the Dodecahedron I did not give the children a model to copy: I gave them 12 Polydron pentagons and said there were three around every vertex. They were able to figure it out for themselves, which I was impressed by. I don’t think this would have been possible without the previous three sessions on two and three dimensional objects.

Y6 girl and Y6 boy dodecahedra

It is impossible to build the Dodecahedron using the generic Geomag as there is too much freedom in how the rods can move around. Instead we went on to the Icosahedron. I had drawn instructions for this, based on making two identical caps then adding 10 rods around the outside of one cap (two on each vertex), then fitting the two pieces together. With a little help from me, but only at the final step, the children were able to make their Icosahedron:

Y6 boy:

Y6 boy icosahedron

Y4 girl:

Y4 girl icosahedron

Y2 girl:

Y2 girl icosahedron

Y1 girl:

Y1 girl icosahedron

The children then moved on to using some Polydron equilateral triangles to make more Icosahedra. They did require some help to make sure there were five triangles at every vertex. See how I have captured two different views in this photo, the second one really bringing out the vertex. (I will admit this was not on purpose).

Y4 and Y2 girl icosahedra

Here is the whole set of five Platonic Solids, from last week and this week:

Set Platonic 31 Jan 2020

I explained to a Y6 girl why there are only five of these that meet the criteria of being regular, convex polyhedra. I put three triangles around a vertex, pointed out the gap in this net, then asked the girl to snap them together. This is the start of the Tetrahedron. We repeated this with four around a vertex, then five. The gap in the net got smaller, giving less height to the cap. Putting six around a vertex leaves no gap in the net: it is two dimensional and cannot make a polyhedron. We then took a look at putting seven around a vertex. I explained that this was a hyperbolic surface. The girl was inspired to see that would happen with eight, nine and then ten around a vertex. The results of 10 are below. I have promised to bring this back next week to continue this exploration of space.

Starting to build the Platonic Solids at the Curious Minds Club (St Thomas of Canterbury Primary School, 24 January 2020)

This week at the Curious Minds Club we focused on three dimensional space by starting to build the Platonic Solids.

I gave the children some Polydron equilateral triangles and showed them the net of a tetrahedron. They were able to build one quite quickly, then form it into a three dimensional object. Next up was the cube. Before handing them the pieces I asked the children if they could work out the cube’s alternative name, based on it having six faces. With a little prompting to think about which two dimensional object has six sides, one girl correctly suggested ‘hexahedron’. The children then constructed their Polydron cubes. I did not show them all 11 nets of a cube (an activity for a later date?) but let them figure it out for themselves. The next was the octahedron. I gave each child eight equilateral triangles and told them that four triangles meet at each vertex. They found this a little harder and I showed them one I had made earlier as a guide.

I decided to leave the final two Platonic solids (the dodecahedron and icosahedron) to next week as I thought it would be too much to attempt all five in one session. I got out some magnetic rods and balls (similar to Geomag but a generic version) and asked the children to make the tetrahedron, cube and octahedron in this material. The Polydron pieces are good at bringing out each face of the solid, but the generic Geomag are better at bringing out the vertex and edge.

Some of the children built quite large cubes with three rods forming an edge. They soon discovered that this made a wobbly and unstable cube, due to the degrees of freedom in a square. I encouraged them to use one rod for an edge, and they had more success this way.

Below are some of the children’s creations:

Collection Platonic Solids1

Collection Platonic Solids2

I had prepared some material on the symmetry of the Platonic solids. I showed one girl how to look at each object in three ways: face on, edge on and vertex on. I gave her two dimensional pictures of each object and a piece of mirror card, and asked her to find the lines of reflective symmetry for each object. She did really well at this activity and seemed to really enjoy looking at the objects in different ways.

We finished with a quick game of Dotty Dinosaurs. This week we played the colour matching version as a memory game.